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Science proves it: Hearing and reading grammatical errors causes stress

Science proves it: Hearing and reading grammatical errors causes stress

Everyone has experienced that annoyance when they hear or read a grammatical error. It's a concern that feels somewhere between disgust and embarrassment, and is all the more profound when the mistake is made by a politician who is supposed to represent the entire country.

Someone has also studied this inconvenience, which is compared to the annoyance caused by chalk bouncing on the blackboard. Two professors at the University of Birmingham, Dagmar Divjak and Peter Milin, have discovered that our body goes into 'stress mode' when it hears grammatical errors.

The research, published in the Journal of Neurolinguistics, considers the English language and includes only 41 individuals, but it may be enough to understand how reading and listening to mistakes in words and sentences gives you headaches. Researchers have discovered a direct link between grammatical errors (or unintelligible accents) and HRV (heart rate variability), i.e. heart rate variability (physiological indicator of autonomic nervous system activity) of the listener.