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Does Botox Protect You From Covid? French study in the face of skepticism of British experts

Does Botox Protect You From Covid? French study in the face of skepticism of

It was created to temporarily eliminate wrinkles in middle age, but Botox can also protect people from infection with Covid. This has been shown by a French study recently. Researchers according to the Daily Mail have said that out of almost 200 of their patients who did botox until July last year, only two of them had experienced coronavirus symptoms.

By comparison, they suggested that 4.4 percent of the French population was already infected with the virus. But other experts have described the study as lukewarm, insisting it is not proven whether Botox is linked to Covid infection, or the possibility of not getting sick. More than one million Britons receive Botox injections each year, and the procedure is even more common in the US.

The toxin, one of the most dangerous known to science, helps reduce wrinkles because it relaxes the muscles mainly in the forehead. But it is also used for medical reasons, as it is injected into patients suffering from migraines and those with involuntary muscle contractions, helping to relieve symptoms.

"About 193 patients were included in the French study, of whom three-quarters were women (146). They were on average in their fifties. According to researchers from Montpellier University Hospital this category had Botox. They were followed for three months after receiving the injections. to see if they become infected with Covid or not.None of them tested positive for Covid, although there were two suspected cases.

A 53-year-old woman developed symptoms after returning from a trip to Las Vegas, but she tested negative. A 70-year-old woman also fell ill, but she was never tested. "No patient was hospitalized," said experts at the Journal of Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

According to them: "Our results show a significant difference between the number of infected individuals in the general population and the number of Botox-injected patients who showed signs of Covid." However, they acknowledged that the region from which patients were selected was not one of the most affected areas in France, but quite the opposite.

To reinforce the idea that Botox could prevent infection with Covid, the team showed a 64-year-old woman from Lozère in southern France who received the treatment. They claimed she was not infected with the virus, despite the fact that everyone else in her village resulted in Covid. They also told of a 46-year-old woman who did not become infected despite her daughter testing positive for the virus. But there is uncertainty as it is not said whether the girl lived with him or his age.

What do we need to know about Botox?

Botulinum toxin works by blocking the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and this results in temporary muscle paralysis. Dr. Dominique Batifol, lead author of the study and other contributors suggested that this could stop Covid infection. They pointed to other documents in which they suggested that nicotine also blocks the receptor to which acetylcholine binds, thus further supporting their theory. Previous studies have suggested that smokers are less likely to suffer from Covid in severe form, but there is still no concrete evidence for this.

The team of researchers acknowledged that more research was needed to determine how Botox could stop an infection from Covid.

Professor Willem van Schaik, director of the Institute of Microbiology and Infection at the University of Birmingham in Britain, criticizes the study.

He told MailOnline: 'This study cannot be used as evidence, not even as initial evidence. The standard for determining whether a treatment is effective in treating or preventing Covid is to do a randomized clinical trial in which you compare treatment to a placebo. But this study does not describe such a thing. The rest of the paper is very speculative. '

* Daily Mail article , translated and adapted into Albanian by Tiranapost.al.